International Humanitarian Law

Contemporary Issues

“Is the Future of ISIS Female?”

The New York Times has featured an article examining the increasingly important role played by women during insurgencies, which suggests that security forces are not presently prepared to adequately respond to this new reality.

“The Imperative of Integrating a Gender Perspective into Military Operations”

This recent ASPI article by Susan Hutchinson and Nathan Bradley considers Australia’s continuing work on its second National Action Plan to implement the Women, Peace and Security (“WPS”) agenda, and argues that national intelligence organisations need to take on a greater responsibility for implementing WPS.

Operational Realities of Detention in Contemporary Armed Conflict

A new post on the ICRC’s Humanitarian Law & Policy blog details five of the most significant operational realities observed by ICRC delegates when visiting conflict detainees in armed conflicts, namely:

  1. Strategy reasons for detaining – and the significance of taking no detainees
  2. Detainees going missing
  3. The blurring of responsibility in coalition warfare
  4. Screening of civilian populations, including IDPs, may amount to detention
  5. Overly restrictive detention regimes

‘Data as a Military Objective’

On the Australian Institute of International Affairs website, Professor Robert McLaughlin considers the developing question of whether data can be mate the object of an attack under the laws of armed conflict – available here.